Nicosia

Cyprus

Sights

The Medieval Walls

The first walls surrounding Lefkosia (Nicosia) in the 14th century were built by the Franks and enclosed a much larger area than the 16th Venetian Walls that still surround the old town. When the Venetians occupied Cyprus, they decided to demolish the Frankish Walls because they were old and did not offer adequate defence against new weapons such as artillery. The Frankish Walls were also too big to be manned by the Venetian army and too close to the hills in the east and southeast of the city.

Forming a circle, the walls built by the Venetians were fortified by eleven heart – shaped bastions and protected by an 80 metres wide moat. They were built of mud – brick, with the lower part only buttressed by stone. When the Ottomans occupied Lefkosia (Nicosia), they repaired the walls and covered the upper part with stones. The moat around the walls now has many different uses, serving as sports fields, public gardens, an open – air sculpture exhibition, car parks etc.

Famagusta Gate
Pafos Gate was one of the three gates in the walls built by the Venetians around Lefkosia (Nicosia). The road beginning immediately outside the gate led southwest to the town of Pafos (Paphos), hence the name. It was also known as Gate of San Domenico, because it replaced an earlier gate of the Frankish walls, called ‘Porta di San Domenico’ after the nearby abbey of San Domenico. The gate is a simple affair, an opening in the wall roofed by a barrel vault. During British occupation in 1878, part of the walls between the Gate and the Roccas Bastion was demolished to create a new opening. Pafos Gate Police Station is just above the original gate.
Laiki Geitonia is a traditional neighbourhood inside the city walls. Houses have been restored to remind the traditional, old Nicosia. It is a pedestrianised area with buildings date from the 18the century and a combination of residential houses, art shops and tavernas.
Archbishop’s Palace

A religious, national and political monument, the Old Archbishop’s Palace is an 18th century two – storey building in the heart of Lefkosia (Nicosia) that is closely associated with modern Cypriot history. Next to it is the new Archbishop’s Palace, a two – storey stone building in Neo – Byzantine style housing the offices of the archdiocese and the residence of the archbishop. It was built by Archbishop Makarios III between 1956 and 1960 and also houses the Byzantine Museum and the Library of the Archbishopric. Since the completion of the new Archbishopric, the Old Archbishop’s Palace has housed the Folk Art Museum and the National Struggle Museum.

Hamam Omeriye

The Omeriye Hamam is in the old town of Lefkosia (Nicosia), next to the Omeriye Mosque and not far from the Archbishop’s Palace. It was built in 1570 – 71 as a donation by Lala Mustafa Pasha to the city after the island fell to the Ottomans. The bath complex or hamam was dedicated to the Caliph Omar and the area became known as Omeriye. The entrance on the south side of the building led first into a small courtyard and then into the reception – hall. This has a vaulted roof and an octagonal cistern in the middle. Behind that hall, there are two rooms of medium temperature and behind these the warm, vaulted room. The hamam is still in use and after its recent restoration has become a favourite place for relaxation in Lefkosia. In 2006 it received the Europa Nostra prize for the Conservation of Architectural Heritage.

The Archontiko of Axiothea

The Archontiko of Axiothea (mansion) is one of the most characteristic examples of urban architecture of the 18th century. It is located in the Old Town of Lefkosia (Nicosia), close to the Green Line and took its name from the road on which it stands. The two – store rebuilding was built in a Π – shape with a north-south orientation, and originally occupied a much larger area. The main entrance is located on the east side of the house and leads to the inner courtyard. On the west and south is a kind of portico defined by a row of arches that separates the courtyard from the rooms that surround it. There are three big halls, two smaller rooms and two auxiliary rooms on the ground floor. There are three more halls and two smaller rooms on the upper floor. Today, the “Archontiko of Axiothea” serves as a centre for cultural activities, exhibitions and literary seminars for the University of Cyprus.

The Liberty Monument is on the Podocatro Bastion of the city walls, close to the old aqueduct and a couple of minutes walk from the Famagusta Gate.

Nicosia Town Hall

The first municipal offices were housed in the house of Chariklia Argirides in an area called Nea Agora (New Market). In 1897 the municipal offices moved to Ledra Street at the house of Efrosini Tarsi and then moved to the Kampia tou Efklidi Eyklides yard, which was since then called Municipality Square, on the site of the present central municipal market. In 1944 they were moved, temporarily, to the building that had housed the Luna Park cabaret on the Davila bastion. In 1951 it was renovated to house the municipal offices permanently. The Hadjisavva opening renamed Metaxas Square was increasingly perceived as the town centre.

The Pancyprian Gymnasium (Παγκύπριο Γυμνάσιο) was founded in 1812 by Archbishop Kyprianos at a time when Cyprus was still under Ottoman rule. It was originally called the Hellenic School (Ελληνική Σχολή) and is the oldest high school still in operation on the island. The school was expanded in 1893 to incorporate a lyceum when Cyprus was under British rule and changed its name to its current one in 1896. In tribute to the school’s contribution to education the Cyprus Post office issued a commemorative stamp in 1993.
The Municipal Multipurpose Centre of Nicosia was created to house social programs.
Roman Aqueduct
Located approximately opposite the Statue of Liberty and very close to the Archbishopric and Famagusta Gate.

The Mayor

Constantinos Yiorkadjis 

Monday to Friday  8.00am – 3.00pm

Contact

The Mayor : Constantinos Yiorkadjis
email
Municipality@nicosiamunicipality.org.cy
address
Eptanisou 11, 1016 Nicosia, P.O BOX 21015, 1500 Nicosia
phone
+(357) 22797000
Fax: +(357) 22663363