VLAŠSKÝ DVŮR

Czechia

The Italian court used to be rightly called the “jewel” of the crown of Czech monarchs, and its charm and charm have survived to this day. The Italian Court is a former royal mint and royal palace, a national cultural monument of pan-European significance, with a thousand-year history. The original fortified seat from the end of the 13th century was rebuilt into the central royal mint by King Wenceslas II. in 1300. Part of the mint reform was the closure of small mints scattered throughout the Czech Kingdom and the introduction of a new coin, the so-called Prague groschen. The production of this currency was concentrated near the richest source of silver in the country – the newly established mint in the Italian court in Kutná Hora, which thus gained a privileged position throughout the kingdom. King Wenceslas IV, who loved Kutná Hora and often stayed here, Vlašský dvůr adapted the needs of the royal residence – he had the royal palace built, which included his private and representative premises, and the chapel of St. Wenceslas. The new royal residence became the venue for important historical events: the Kutná Hora Decree was signed here in 1409, in 1444 the future Czech King George of Poděbrady was elected the highest governor of the East Bohemian Landfryd and in 1448 the provincial administrator, in 1471 young Polish prince Vladislav Jagiellonsky elected Czech king. Later, the Vlašský dvůr gradually began to lose its importance and was not further extensively and costly rebuilt until the end of the 19th century under the leadership of architect Ludvík Lábler. The neo-Gothic reconstruction gave the Italian court its present appearance and restored the original grandeur, splendor and nobility of the royal residence. which included his private and representative spaces, and the chapel of St. Wenceslas. The new royal residence became the venue for important historical events: the Kutná Hora Decree was signed here in 1409, in 1444 the future Czech King George of Poděbrady was elected the highest governor of the East Bohemian Landfryd and in 1448 the provincial administrator, in 1471 young Polish prince Vladislav Jagiellonsky elected Czech king. Later, the Vlašský dvůr gradually began to lose its significance and was not further extensively and costly rebuilt until the end of the 19th century under the leadership of architect Ludvík Lábler. The neo-Gothic reconstruction gave the Italian court its present appearance and restored the original grandeur, splendor and nobility of the royal residence. which included his private and representative spaces, and the chapel of St. Wenceslas. The new royal residence became the venue for important historical events: the Kutná Hora Decree was signed here in 1409, in 1444 the future Czech King George of Poděbrady was elected the highest governor of the East Bohemian Landfryd and in 1448 the provincial administrator, in 1471 he was young Polish prince Vladislav Jagiellonsky elected Czech king. Later, the Vlašský dvůr gradually began to lose its importance and was not further extensively and costly rebuilt until the end of the 19th century under the leadership of architect Ludvík Lábler. The neo-Gothic reconstruction gave the Italian court its present appearance and restored the original grandeur, splendor and nobility of the royal residence. in 1409 the Kutná Hora Decree was signed here, in 1444 the future Czech King George of Poděbrady was elected the highest governor of East Bohemian Landfryds and in 1448 the provincial administrator, in 1471 the young Polish prince Vladislav Jagiellonský was elected Czech king. Later, the Vlašský dvůr gradually began to lose its importance and was not further extensively and costly rebuilt until the end of the 19th century under the leadership of architect Ludvík Lábler. The neo-Gothic reconstruction gave the Italian court its present appearance and restored the original grandeur, splendor and nobility of the royal residence. in 1409 the Kutná Hora Decree was signed here, in 1444 the future Czech King George of Poděbrady was elected the highest governor of East Bohemian Landfryds and in 1448 the provincial administrator, in 1471 the young Polish prince Vladislav Jagiellonský was elected Czech king. Later, the Vlašský dvůr gradually began to lose its significance and was not further extensively and costly rebuilt until the end of the 19th century under the leadership of architect Ludvík Lábler. The neo-Gothic reconstruction gave the Italian court its present appearance and restored the original grandeur, splendor and nobility of the royal residence. Later, the Vlašský dvůr gradually began to lose its significance and was not further extensively and costly rebuilt until the end of the 19th century under the leadership of architect Ludvík Lábler. The neo-Gothic reconstruction gave the Italian court its present appearance and restored the original grandeur, splendor and nobility of the royal residence. Later, the Vlašský dvůr gradually began to lose its importance and was not further extensively and costly rebuilt until the end of the 19th century under the leadership of architect Ludvík Lábler. The neo-Gothic reconstruction gave the Italian court its present appearance and restored the original grandeur, splendor and nobility of the royal residence.

Vlašský dvůr offers three sightseeing routes with interactive elements that will be appreciated not only by children, but also by a playful adult: “Mystery of Lost Silver”, “Royal Mint” and “Royal Palace”. In the Royal Mint you will see an interesting exhibition of coins minted in the Italian Court, a demonstration of the medieval technique of coin minting and the journey of silver ore to the Prague groschen.The third guided tour will take you with a guide through the audience hall, the royal chapel with unique decoration and you will look at the film chambers of the monarchs related to Kutná Hora.In the corridors you can get acquainted with Kutná Hora personalities and the history of the city administration.In the visitor center and part of the “Flight through Kutná Hora World”Rest for a while before the guided tour or here you can get more information about Kutná Hora, about local monuments, or about the whole course of reconstruction of new exhibitions.

Contact

VLAŠSKÝ DVŮR
email
vlasskydvur@pskh.cz
address
Havlíčkovo náměstí 552, 284 01 Kutná Hora
phone
+420 327 512 873